Auto Service World
News   August 8, 2002   by Auto Service World

From Cave Paintings to Clearcoat, Future of Coatings in Science magazine


One of the world’s foremost scientists on coatings–one of the oldest technologies known to humans–will have his scientific paper “20th- to 21st-Century Technological Challenges in Soft Coatings” featured in the upcoming edition of Science magazine.
As part of the August 9 edition of Science, Dr. Robert R. Matheson, Jr., a DuPont senior scientist, details the future of technological advances in coatings — one of the world’s most ancient technologies. Relatively soft coatings — comprising organic materials such as blood, eggs and extracts from plants — were in use more than 20,000 years ago.
Coatings activity has been continuously practiced since then with gradually improving materials and application techniques. While technologies have advanced over time, the fundamental purposes of protecting or decorating surfaces have remained constant across all the centuries and cultures of civilization. Matheson’s paper in Science examines change in soft coatings technology from its current state by identifying key issues that attract research and development efforts at the dawn of the 21st century.
Matheson points out that today’s challenges are to decrease the environmental footprint and improve biological, mechanical and transport longevity, while minimizing the application requirements for soft coatings.
Matheson notes that “a need exists in the automotive world for a painting system with lower environmental emissions (particularly volatile organic compounds, VOCs), improved resistance to environmental damage, outdoor durability, corrosion resistance, and improved application robustness. This need has been recently met with what might be considered an exemplary modern coatings system.”
For example, the goal of reducing solvent emissions of automotive paint took a major leap forward this year with the introduction of DuPont “Super Solids” ultra-low emissions coatings technology at the DaimlerChrysler assembly plant in Newark, Del.
The new Super Solids technology reduces volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions of the final protective clear coat applied to the Dodge Durango at the plant by 25 percent. DuPont has been able to accomplish this by increasing the solids content of the coating to 65 percent from an industry high-solids coatings standard of 50 percent solids and 50 percent solvent.
At the same time, the technology offers a significant improvement in scratch and mar resistance to prolong the appearance of the paint finish over repeated washings. The technology breakthrough is the result of fundamental molecular engineering research and the development of analytical equipment and tools to guide that research, according to Matheson.
“The basis of the work is to change the nature of oligomers that are defined as small polymer chains with few structural units and give them structure by changing their reactivity with each other. We have demonstrated that this technology breakthrough will allow us to further increase the solids content of coatings to more than 80 percent,” he said.


Print this page

Related


Have your say:

Your email address will not be published.

*