Auto Service World
Feature   September 1, 2000   by CARS Magazine

In Fort Simpson, Winterization Means Winterization

Daryl Sloat, of D J Automotive in Fort Simpson, Northwest Territories (five hours north of the B.C. border) lives and works in an environment where winter means more than a frosted windshield. "Usuall...


Daryl Sloat, of D J Automotive in Fort Simpson, Northwest Territories (five hours north of the B.C. border) lives and works in an environment where winter means more than a frosted windshield. “Usually around October it starts to get cold, until about April. There are still cars here, but mostly trucks and minivans. We check their block heaters, their antifreeze, and flush the rad if it’s dirty. We’ve had a few days, but on average (last winter), it was about 40 below. The antifreeze will protect you, but it still won’t start. We use a lot of synthetic oils here, too. We sell Motorcraft batteries here, but we don’t blanket them, because we find that if you plug them in with your block heater, after a year or two it evaporates the acid out of them. So I don’t bother.

Customers pay around $150 to get them winterized. We can make a profit at that. The roads here are gravel and highway. A lot of tires, front end parts and windshields. We do a lot of front ends around here, so we pick a lot of that stuff up when they’re in for winterization. Especially after a good rain; you get potholes.”


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